• Two sandwiches, chips on the side
  • Brewing equipment
  • Pepperoni pizza
Somewhere in Particular Brewery logo

Meet the Brewmaster

Our founding brewmaster, Pat Sullivan, was Nowhere In Particular until our opening in October 2018. He continues today at Nowhere In Particular Brewing Company.

Our current brewmaster came to be by accident and passion. Jimmy Clark was a golf teaching professional and during an injury and recovery in 2016, he immersed himself in the world of brewing. A self taught brewer, Jimmy developed a passion and intellect for his craft. If you're lucky to be in the brewery while he’s hard at work, you’ll smell the fruits of that labor, and get to taste it in every poured pint. If you see him out and about in the brewery, say hello and thank him for all that beer at Somewhere In Particular Brewing Company.

A Brief History of Our
Beautiful Brewery . . .

As you walk through our doors and enjoy our brewery, we are excited to share the rich history behind it. The story moves from our country, to our state, to our area, to the road you took to get here. As you enjoy our special brews, please take some time to go back through history with us to get a better understanding of how we arrived at, most likely, the oldest still-standing property in the Northwest segment of Columbus, Ohio. There is so much to tell...

The Country

On March 20, 1800, John Adams, second president of America, granted 4,000 acres of Central Ohio land to Jonathan Dayton, a well-known politician from New Jersey, as a gift for Dayton's military service during the Revolutionary War. This land formed the boundaries for the current Northwest corner of the Columbus area.

The State

After the war, Dayton became a politician and also bought land totaling 250,000 acres in the burgeoning Ohio territory. In fact, the city of Dayton is named after him even though he never actually stepped foot there! He continued to serve in New Jersey politics until his death in 1824.

The Area

John Stewart bought a large portion of Dayton's land for only $3,000.00. Although Stewart never built on the land, when he died, the estate was divided among his heirs, and his daughter, Mary Stewart, was awarded 539 acres. She married Robert C. Henderson, and upon her death, their son, Joseph, inherited the land, started a cattle ranch, built the house in 1859, and moved here with his wife. Its southern border formed Henderson Pike (now Road), named so for the Henderson family. The house stayed in the family for 80 years until a new owner came into the picture.

The Road

In 1938, Arthur Dierker bought 68 acres of the Henderson estate and restored the old farmhouse to its former glory. They added the garage and living quarters including a bell tower. The Dierker's lane was later expanded to connect Henderson and Bethel Roads and was named Dierker Road (the road you took to get here) in honor of the Dierker family. Fortunately, the Dierkers chose to keep the quaint 64 square foot log smokehouse, which existed as the original “kitchen” in the early days of the main house as was the custom back then and remains in the middle of the parking lot today.

Modern Era

In 1984, The Borror Company, a local development, construction, and property management company, purchased the 68-acre property from the Dierker estate and used the house as their offices. Then, in 1987, the Stevenson/Nash Partnership purchased the main property's 1.8 acres that included the home and used it as the main office for Northwest Title for 30 years.

Finally, Keith Dailey and John Chess purchased the property in 2016 with the intent of opening a brewpub. Dailey and Chess set about making repairs and constructing the necessary structures to see their dream through, resulting in the beautiful brewery you see here today.